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saloon

Sunday, December 3 at 7:00 PM8:00 PM EST

Quimby’s Bookstore NYC

536 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, New York 11211

Details

The Woman Rebel: Revolutionary Politics, Rollicking Parties and the Women who Shook New York.

Imagine you are at a party with the anarchist Emma Goldman, the dancer Isadora Duncan and the women’s health pioneer Margaret Sanger. Two things are probably true: you are at Mabel Dodge’s celebrated Wednesday Night Salon, and Marcel Duchamp is swinging from the chandelier.

When Dodge began her salon in 1912, she claimed, “every thinking person nowadays is in revolt against something.” At the time, Radical Politics thrived on the Lower East Side, Modern Art was radiating out of Greenwich Village, social and sexual mores were in flux south of 14th street, and women were at the vanguard of the Revolution.

This talk will explore what made downtown so ripe for rebellion, and honor the radical women who called the area home. Along the way, we’ll meet the Rebel Girl and the Priestess of Anarchy, check out the saloon known as the “most famous radical center in New York,” and discover which nightclub has been “an idyllic place of controversy and entertainment” for over a century.

Kick up your heals and join us!

Bio

Lucie Levine is the founder of Archive on Parade, a local tour and event company that takes New York’s fascinating history out of the archives and into the streets. She’s a Native New Yorker, and licensed New York City tour guide, with a passion for the city’s fascinating social, political and cultural history. She’s worked with institutions including the 92nd Street Y, The New York Public Library, the St. Regis Hotel, Fraunces Tavern, The Brooklyn Brainery and The Society for the Advancement of Social Studies to offer exciting tours, lectures and events all over town. She is also the News Editor for Greenpointers, and her work and events have been featured on Greenpointers, Untapped Cities, 6sqft, Brokelyn and The Skint.

$10.00 suggested donation

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Though if you visit McSorely’s, you might think from looking at it that it is an old-time saloon preserved in its original condition, and surely, that is what they want you to think, not everything in McSorley’s is 100% original to the time period in which it originated.  This article sheds some light on one particular item to be seen in McSorely’s interior decoration which was salvaged in the mid 20th century from a nearby building that is now bygone…

from Ephemeral New York: “The curious fireplace in McSorley’s back room

McSorley’s Bar on East Seventh Street in the East Village is the keeper of wonderful old New York relics.

There are framed newspaper clippings from the 19th century, Harry Houdini’s handcuffs, a collection of wishbones left by soldiers who never returned from World War I, and of course, that pot-bellied stove that has kept generations of drinkers toasty.

In the back room is another curious artifact: a fireplace that spells out “Bible House” in gold capital letters under the wood mantel.

McSorleysbiblehouse

What was Bible House? In the late 19th and early 20th century, you wouldn’t have to ask.

This six-story building at Astor Place and East Ninth Street between Third and Fourth Avenues was the imposing headquarters of the American Bible Society, an organization devoted to printing and distributing millions of bibles.

McSorleysbiblehouse1890

Bible House, the city’s first cast-iron building, went up in 1853, replacing the group’s older headquarters on Nassau Street.

Along with the Astor Library (now The Public Theater) and the newly formed Cooper Institute, Bible House helped make Astor Place a hub of intellectual and literary activity.

McSorleysbiblehousecu

Because of its size and appearance, Bible House became a tourist attraction of its own in the late 19th century. The printing rooms inside ultimately cranking out 77 million bibles. Yet as the neighborhood’s fortunes slipped in the ensuing decades, so did the building.

McSorleysbiblehouse1955MCNY

In 1956, after Bible House was torn down and replaced by a Cooper Union building, McSorley’s apparently salvaged one of the hearths, preserving it amid the sawdust floors and dusty frames in the bar’s back room.

Hat tip again to Dean at the History Author Show for this story! [Third image: King’s Handbook of New York via the Village Alliance; fifth image: MCNY]

 

 

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