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South Street Seaport

April 2017 marks fifty years since the
Museum received its charter from the New
York State Department of Education Board of
Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has
grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and
works of art documenting the rise of New York
as a port city.; developing and implementing
innovative and award-winning programming;
mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of
historic ships on the East River. Despite three
massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great
Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurri-
cane Sandy, the museum is growing once again.
With support from New York City and a dedi-
cated group of staff, volunteers, members and
friends, the Seaport Museum remains an edu-
cational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.
The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will
be marked throughout the year with the open-
ing of new exhibitions, including Millions:
Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great
Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic
and musical performances, lectures and book
talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anni-
versary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship
Wavertree in September. #

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The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Upcoming Exhibition:
Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914, will open at the South Street Seaport Museum in June 2017. Between 1900 and 1914 New York experienced the greatest influx of immigrants in its history. The Seaport Museum’s lightship Ambrose (LV-87), which marked the entrance of New York Harbor from 1908 until 1932, was onsite for the last few years of this wave of immigration. Carried across the Atlantic aboard ocean liners such as Titanic’s sister Olympic, these migrants shared these ships with some of the wealthiest people in the world. This exhibition will explore the tensions between the extraordinarily wealthy First-Class passengers and immigrants in Third Class. Even though First Class and Third Class sailed together on the same ships, their journeys were worlds apart.

ABOUT SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM
South Street Seaport Museum is a non-profit cultural institution located in the heart of the historic Seaport district in New York City. Founded in 1967, the South Street Seaport Museum preserves and interprets the history of New York as a great port city. Designated by Congress as America’s National Maritime Museum, the Museum houses galleries and education spaces, working nineteenth century print shops, a maritime library, a maritime craft center, and a fleet of historic vessels that all work to tell the story of “Where New York Begins.”…

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From Chelsea Now: Exhibit Puts the Wind Back in Seaport Museum’s Sails

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In Smells the Same, written for Lucky Peach, Joana Avillez narrates her experience having lived as a child near the Fulton Fish Market when it was operating as a fish market, and ordinary mortals could afford to live in the South Street Seaport area because it was overlooked and near an actual wholesale fish market.  She later asked some of the former Fulton Fish Market workers (now at Hunt’s Point) for their advice on the most recent stalled gentrification project to infect the area since the authorities forced the Fish market out in 2005.…

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