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Staten Island

A facebook posting from HB West:

Did you know: In 1968, Twyla Tharp created a dance in the gymnasium of Wagner College? It was called “Generation” and featured a young Sara Rudner and Ms. Tharp herself, among the cast. Lighting by Jennifer Tipton. #StatenIslandDanceHistory #StatenIslandDanceProject #oralhistories

Generation consists of five simultaneous solos, each dancer in her own separate orbit. The dynamic ebbs and wanes as the movement changes tempo and quality; actions build until the dancers are moving so fast or so slow that the integrity of the original phrases disintegrates.
twylatharp.org

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From silive.com:

Developer files plans to build on site of 90-year-old Staten Island church

This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
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STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A Staten Island developer has filed plans to build eight semi-attached homes on the site of the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church in South Beach.

According to Building Department records, Mitchell Pacifico, a principal of Mp Realty Holding Corp., Travis, who is listed as owner, plans to build eight semi-attached homes over four 45 x 100 lots on Sand Lane.

The lots would be sub-divided from the original parcel at 207 Sand Lane, and the church and adjacent rectory on the site demolished.

Pacifico said he bid on the property after seeing it for sale on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS). He would not disclose the amount, but public records indicate the property sold for $1.5 million.

The new construction would be marketed as Sand Lane Estates. Peter Calvanico, of Calvanico Associates, Willowbrook, is listed as the architect for the project.

Pacifico described the project as “high end” three-bedroom semi-attached homes, with full basements, each with a living room, dining room and eat-in-kitchen. He said construction could begin by early spring.

The 90-year-old stucco and wood-frame church, built by hand by Italian immigrants, is located two blocks from the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Boardwalk in South Beach. It served as a neighborhood mobilization center during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, but has not been used for mass since 2015, according to the Rev. Michael Martine, pastor of Holy Rosary.

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According to the pastor, the church suffered heavy water damage in March 2016 when the original pipes burst, causing water to damage the ceiling and walls. The building was deemed irreparable.

Father Martine said the proceeds from the sale “will greatly improve the financial position of our parish.” He said the money would go toward retiring the debt the parish incurred with the building of the new Holy Rosary Church, at 120 Jerome Ave., in the early 1990s, as well as the Father Dominic Epifano Parish Center across the street, that was built a few years later, in early 2000s. A new boiler will also be purchased for the adjacent Holy Rosary School, which was built in the 1950s.

Holy Rosary has preserved and restored an original hand-carved wooden crucifix as well as a fresco painting that was displayed over the altar in the Sand Lane church. Both are now in the daily mass chapel of the Jerome Avenue church.

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In their special section “Summer Fun in Staten Island,” published on June 28, 2017, the New York Daily News said that our monthly Sea Shanty Sessions, led by the Folk Music Society of New York, offer “…a great opportunity to experience authentic, time-honored maritime songs in an appropriately historic setting.” The next session is this Sunday, August 20, from 2 to 5 PM. This even is family friendly and free, but we always appreciate your donations. #NYCulture

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From Museum of the City of New York blog: Summer in the City

Now that summer is in full swing, we look back at the ways New Yorkers have either escaped or embraced the heat.

The Drive in Central Park was a place to see and be seen, particularly for the wealthiest New Yorkers, who dressed in their finest attire and rode carriages through the park.

Byron Company. Central Park: The Drive, Summer. 1894. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.17778

At the turn of the century, long black stockings typically accompanied women’s bathing suits (or bathing gowns, as they were called). Bathing suits became less restrictive a few years later, when women began participating in competitive swimming.

Byron Company. Sports, Bathing, Midland Beach. 1898. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.17470

Before air conditioning, it was not uncommon for tenement dwellers to put their mattresses on the roof and sleep through the season’s hottest nights.

John Sloan. Roofs, Summer Night. 1906. Museum of the City of New York. 82.200.1

The Jackie Robinson Pool originally opened as the Colonial Park Pool in Harlem on August 8, 1936. It was one of 11 swimming pools opened throughout the city that year and funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA), a New Deal agency created to combat the Great Depression.

Sid Grossman. Federal Art Project. Colonial Park Swimming Pool, Harlem. 1939. Museum of the City of New York. 43.131.9.58

Some New Yorkers preferred water hoses to swimming pools.

United States. Office of War Information. Children spraying a hose from a porch. 1944. Museum of the City of New York. 90.28.88

Every summer, Coney Island’s boardwalk bustles with city dwellers seeking a respite from the heat.

Andrew Herman. Federal Art Project. Feeding Ice-Cream to the Dog. 1939. Museum of the City of New York. 43.131.5.34

Nathan’s Famous opened in Coney Island at Surf and Stillwell Avenues in 1916, where it still stands today and attracts scores of New Yorkers and tourists alike.

Andrew Herman. Federal Art Project. Nathan’s Hot Dog Stand, Coney Island. 1939. Museum of the City of New York. 43.131.5.13

Coney Island’s Steeplechase Park began hosting an annual poolside beauty contest called Modern Venus in 1913. Beauty contests flourished as bathing suits became skimpier.

Reginald Marsh. Modern Venus Contest at Steeplechase Park. 1939. Museum of the City of New York. 90.36.2.2.2F

After World War II, folk singers began congregating in Washington Square. The singers and their audience clashed with some residents of the neighborhood, who thought they were a nuisance. In 1947, the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation started issuing permits for public performances in city parks. In 1961, Parks Commissioner Newbold Morris rejected folk singers’ applications to play in Washington Square. Protests ensued, culminating in a fight between the musicians and their supporters and the police seeking to clear the crowds. In the end, a compromise was reached, with folk singers being allowed in the park on Sunday afternoons.

Frederick Kelly. Musicians – Washington Square. 1962.

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From The North Shore Local-Staten Island Local:

SI Then: The Goethals Bridge

After the First World War, the U.S. was on the move.

With the new prosperity, wanderlust and mass-produced automobiles, the Goethals Bridge was built to accommodate interstate travel.

The bridge opened on June 29, 1928, the same day as the Outerbridge Crossing. Both were designed by John Alexander Low Waddell. This was the first successful bi-state development project by the then-new Port Authority. It sported two 10-foot-wide lanes in each direction.

The new bridge was named after Major General George W. Goethals. Construction supervisor of the Panama Canal and the first consulting engineer of the NY/NJ Port Authority, he died just three months before the bridge’s opening, which also would have been his 70th birthday.

The same month saw the establishment of the Port Authority Police. Its 40 original officers, known as Bridgemen, were deployed to patrol and protect both the Outerbridge and the Goethals bridges.

The Goethals did not recoup its original construction costs until 1964, when the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge was completed.

This year, 3,566,101 EZpass equipped vehicles crossed over it between January and March.

It was finally closed this month when the first of two new parallel bridges opened to replace it. The second will open in 2018. Built higher and wider, they will accommodate more traffic and larger ships passing under them.

Until it is finally dismantled, the original Goethals is truly now only a bridge to the past.


As of July 4th, 2017, the original Goethals Bridge is closed for good, and the first of the new parallel bridges has been officially opened. What name, if any, will be given to them, remains to be seen.

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From silive.com:

Schaffer’s Tavern: Winky says ‘it’s time’ for last call; sets closing date

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Local historians will lead a lecture–World War I Centennial commemorating World War I in America on  Saturday at 2 at the Staten Island Museum, Snug Harbor, 1000 Richmond Terr., Bldg. A. This program is supported by the Library of America. Refreshments will be served. Lecture is Free with Museum Admission. For info, visit http://www.statenislandmuseum.org/calendar-programs/world-war-i-centennial-lecture

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From the e-newsletter of the Committee To Save Mt. Manresa:

Don’t miss the latest report on our North Shore Watchlist…properties that have zoning issues, or historical sites at risk.     Don’t forget to sign our petition to Landmark St. Mary.  If you have a special connection to the church, please leave a comment about What St. Mary’s means to you. http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/landmark-st-mary-church?mailing_id=37146&source=s.icn.em.cr&r_by=237480
STATEN ISLAND REAL-TIME NEWS

Development concerns: 10 properties North Shore residents are keeping an eye on Updated March 12, 2017 
Lessons learned from Mount Manresa

Members of the Committee to Save Mount Manresa say they  learned a harsh lesson when Mount Manresa was sold to developers to build townhouses.

The organization has received feedback from other North Shore residents both at Community Board 1 meetings and at other forums, and has compiled a North Shore “watch list” for properties that could be ideal for developers.

“These are properties of concern — they have either historical significance or they are large properties that are not properly zoned,” said Barbara Sanchez of the Committee to Save Mount Manresa.

………..

Coast Guard in Rosebank

Located in Rosebank off Bay Street on 1 Anchor Place is the U.S. Coast Guard Station. While many think the Coast Guard will never move, some North Shore residents believe there’s no guarantee.

“City Planning says the Coast Guard isn’t planning to go anywhere….but that’s what everyone said about Mount Manresa….After Mount Manresa we are very sensitive to these large properties,” Sanchez said.

(Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel)

St. Mary’s Church

St. Mary’s Church in Rosebank is one of the oldest churches on Staten Island. “It’s a large part of Rosebank history,” Sanchez, noting that St. Mary’s Church is zoned R4, which means that the property could be sold to developers for any type of housing.

Many North Shore residents would like to see the church landmarked, as it is an architectural focal point in Rosebank, with its prominent tower visible for miles around.

(Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel)

Bayley Seton campus

The Salvation Army announced in March 2016 that its proposal for the Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, to be built on a portion of the old Bayley Seton Hospital that it purchased in 2009, was not financially viable.  Borough President James Oddo, who fought hard for the Kroc Center, has said his office plans to pursue constructing some other Salvation Army center on the property.

North Shore residents still express concern that the portion of the former hospital campus could be sold off to developers for large-scale housing.

(Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel)

Former Sun Chemical

The former Sun Chemical site in Rosebank, which closed its doors in January 2008, may become the site of future back-to-back attached townhouses, according to the Office of the Borough President.

According to Sun Chemical, the property is “under a sale agreement” with 2846 Partners LLC. The property will first have to be rezoned from manufacturing to residential. While the property was remediated to clean up toxic materials that had seeped into the ground over the decades the plant was in operation, Oddo and others in the community question whether it is still hazardous for homeowners.…

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From Richard Simpson via facebook:

Another piece of local history was demolished this week. It was the old Richmond Ice Company building on Edgewater Street at the corner of Sylvaton Terrace in Rosebank. The four-story cement building topped with gargoyles was built ca. 1905.

The company’s name Richmond Ice Company is/was inscribed on the waterside of the building which made it a prominent landmark when sailing into New York Harbor.

The Richmond Ice Company building was owned by the Richmond County Ice Company, incorporated in 1897 with capital of $5,000. Its directors were John Franzreb, James Guyon Timolat, Charles Jacobsen, John F. Smith, all of New Brighton and Robert G. Solomon of Concord.

Ice harvesting was a big business here in Staten Island. The ice trade also known as the frozen water trade made many men very wealthy. One of the largest ice companies was E.A. Britton & Sons who owed Britton’s Pond. The “E” stood for Elizabeth. The “A” might have stood for her deceased husband, Abraham, who built a grist mill on the pond cr. 1825. About 1880 the mill was turned into an ice house. Elizabeth and Abraham’s sons were Harry C. and Winfield S. Britton.
The Britton’s cut the ice in large chunks sometimes measuring ten feet by ten feet. The chunks were put on a conveyor belt and pulled into the ice house where it was cut into smaller more manageable pieces. The ice was distributed to local businesses, especially beer breweries.

James Guyon Timolat married into the Britton family and took the ice business to the next level. He cut the ice from the pond and transported it by horse and carriage to the company’s ice storage house on Edgewater Street. Every other day a boat or barge (which at that time pulled up to the ice house) was loaded with ice and shipped to Manhattan and other cities in the Metropolitan area where it was sold to food purveyors, restaurants, hospitals and private residences. Many of the wealthy who summered on Long Island built a small ice house on their property and served iced tea and lemonade over ice on a hot summer day.

By the late teens and early 1920s the ice business decreased due to the invention of the ice box (refrigerator).

In the early 1920s the Richmond Ice Company sold the Britton Pond property to the New York City Parks Department and was renamed Clove Lakes.

Ironically, the Richmond Ice Company building is located a few hundred feet from St. Mary’s R.C. Church on Bay Street which unless it is landmarked is also in danger of being demolished.

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Image may contain: bridge, sky, outdoor and nature

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From a facebook posting by Michael Cala:
“I’m very pleased, as a first-time applicant, to announce that I was just awarded a sizable grant from Staten Island Arts to mount an exhibition of my vintage Coney Island photographs (1970-1980). The exhibition will hopefully take place some time in mid-2017. Got some great people on board to help with printing and mounting. And the initial exhibit will be held at the Garibaldi-Meucci Museum.” …

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