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$69 Tix To A Great Gatsby NYE: 4 Hr Premium Open Bar & Food ($95 Value)
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DETAILS

Usher in 2018 with luscious libations and bygone opulence at The Daisy, a gorgeous, Art Deco-inspired haunt on the Upper East Side. Come through to The Great Gatsby New Year’s Eve starting at 9:00pm on Sunday December 31, 2017.

Grab your $69 Ticket (a $95 value) to celebrate the New Year with a fantastic 4 Hour Premium Open Bar from 9:00pm until 1:00am. You’ll get 2018 off the ground with endless rounds of farm-to-bar specialty cocktails by Beverage Director Nate Fishman.

May we suggest the Ripple My Bitcoin (Michter’s whiskey, orange liqueur, lime, cynar, ginger beer), or the American Beauty (Farmer’s organic gin, white tea-infused rosewater, lemon, prosecco) – two appealing cocktails, fit for the grandeur of the night.

Let’s definitely not forget about exquisite hors d’oeuvres courtesy of Executive Chef Juan Meza, formerly of 2 Michelin-starred Aquavit. Think: Slab Bacon Sliders, Mushroom Soup Shooters, and the Seafood Platter featuring little neck clams, octopus, prawns, and oysters graced with Champagne mignonette & tapioca pearls…

Come into this halcyon dream and soak up the vintage decadence. It will be a night that Gatsby himself would envy…

LOCATION
The Daisy
1641 2nd Avenue
(646) 964-5756
MERCHANT

Created by the team behind Agave in the West Village, The Daisy is a widely acclaimed, seasonally-driven restaurant, bar & lounge that balances effortless elegance with subtle splendor.

The gorgeously textured space with its washes of tonal grays, watercolor walls, and white marble tables with rounded corners transitions seamlessly from leisurely suppers to all-night excess.

Infuse this New Year’s Eve with chic panache at this Prohibition extravaganza. Revel in sweet sophistication as you imbibe, mingle, whisper, and laugh the night away.

When the clock strikes midnight, bottles will pop and Champagne will overflow, but rest assured your night is just getting started. Time is on your side…

Your $69 Ticket (a $95 Value) Includes:

  • Admission to A Great Gatsby NYE from 9:00pm until 4:00am on Sunday December 31, 2017.
  • 4 Hour Premium Open Bar from 9:00pm until 1:00am, including a selection of The Daisy’s Signature Cocktails, such as the Crazy in Love (vodka, grapefruit, lime, beet-elderflower) and the Hypnotize (Santera Tequila Bianco, blood orange, lejay cassis).
  • Delectable Hors D’Oeuvres such as Slab Bacon Sliders, Mushroom Soup Shooters, and the Seafood Platter.
  • Live Screening of the Ball Drop.
  • Champagne Toast at Midnight.
  • Live DJ Sets.

The Daisy’s Website | A Great Gatsby NYE

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Start Date : 12.12.2017
Historic Cooking Workshop: Sugar Plums and Wassail

December 12, 6:30 pm

Hands on candy making session with a toast to the holidays

Did you know that there are no plums in sugar plums?  This ancient sweet treat was a favorite of 19th-century New Yorkers.  Learn about their ancient and recent past in this hands-on session, package your treats up for gift giving and toast with some wassail to get the holiday spirit going!

$25 Adults:, $20 Members and Students with ID

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

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Island Historical Tour (North)

Thursday, September 7, 2017

6:00 p.m.7:30 p.m.

This event repeats on the 1st Thursday of every 2 months between 5/4/2017 and 9/7/2017.

Did you know that the Randall’s Island was once three separate land masses? The island has a rich and unique history. Come learn more about the influential people, the bridges, and the landscape changes that transformed the Randall’s Island into the beautiful park it is today!

Location

Randall’s Island Connector in Randall’s Island Park
Manhattan

Directions to this location

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Randall’s Island

Contact Number

(212) 860-1899

Contact Email

info@randallsisland.org

Categories

Education, Nature, History, Tours, Waterfront

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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Our New Exhibit begins : July 11

Controversial  elections, voting rights, abolition and slavery!  In 1820s New York, while these issues burned in  the minds of the public—newspapers exploded  and competed  as  forums for debate!    This exhibit looks at the newly exploding  newspaper industry  of the 1820s –and the entry of  women and African Americans into the business of print.

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

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from Eater New York:

Le Perigord Shutters After 53 Years to De-Unionize

Owner Georges Briguet plans to reopen it as a new restaurant later this year

Update: Local 100 organizer Mike Feld tells Eater that he’s been negotiating with Briguet since last year, and the owner’s been clear that he’s not happy with the increases.…

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from DNAinfo:

Mimi’s Pizza Priced Out of the Upper East Side After 51 Years, Owners Say

By Shaye Weaver | June 30, 2016 10:45am

 Mimi's Pizza, which was a favorite of people like Sir Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen and others, closed on Sunday.

Mimi’s Pizza is closed due to too high costs, the Vanacore family says. View Full Caption

UPPER EAST SIDE — The Vanacore family watched as the final remnants of Mimi’s Pizza were taken away after a public auction on Tuesday.

The longtime pizzeria — which over the 51 years it’s been on the Upper East Side was frequented by big names like Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen and Bobby Flay — served its last slice on Sunday after the family and the landlord couldn’t agree on terms for a new lease, they said.

“It seems like the Upper East Side is no longer a place for a family business,” said Lisa Vanacore, who owns the shop with her husband, Stephen. “It’s very difficult.”

The couple and their 19-year-old daughter Christina Perrotta were gathered at the restaurant on the corner of East 84th Street and Lexington Avenue to hand off the remains of their kitchen equipment and furniture on Wednesday afternoon.

They compared losing the restaurant to mourning a family member. From 2000 to 2003, Stephen Vanacore lost his mother, brother and his father, Dominic, who went by Mimi and whom the eatery was named after.

“It is like losing them all over again,” said Perrotta, adding that she had worked at Mimi’s Pizza with her parents since she was 2 years old. “I feel bad for my step-dad. His heart and soul was in this business.”

“This was the last piece of us,” Lisa Vanacore added, tearing up.

The family said they could not negotiate an affordable rent with their landlord, and will have to be out of the space by Friday. They declined to say how much they were being asked to pay. The landlord did not respond to request for comment.

Lexington Avenue was all mom-and-pop shops when Stephen Vanacore was growing up and working at Mimi’s, he said. There was a candy store, a butcher shop, an independent drug store and a print shop, Yorkville Copy, around the corner that was priced out two months ago, Vanacore said.

“We had a cleaners here that had to close and the pet store closed. The demographics are changing,” Lisa Vanacore said. “All we see now is Starbucks, drugstores and banks. We’re priced out of the neighborhood and I think it’s hard for a pizzeria to make these kind of rents no matter what kind of history we have up here.”

The Vanacores live in New Jersey now but used to live right across the street so they could see the bread being delivered every morning, they said.

Upper East Side resident James Tang, 32, was a regular at the pizzeria, having gone there since the time he was a child.

“When I had chicken pox when I was 4, it was the only thing I wanted,” he told DNAinfo New York on Wednesday. “It’s really sad and actually a travesty.

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