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Upper East Side

from Lost City:

04 September 2012

Lascoff Drugs Closes After a 113 Years

I thought upper Lexington Avenue had a special force field surrounding it (i.e.—influential rich people) that allowed an inordinate number of old businesses to survive. But, alas, I was wrong. If the bluebloods couldn’t save the iconic Upper East Side pharmacy Lascoff Drugs, what can they save?
Lascoff closed last July after 113 years in business. I don’t know how I missed that. I guess lately I’ve unconsciously learned to avert my eyes when beautiful landmarks shutter. I just can’t bear the pain.
Lascoff, along with Bigelow and one or two others, was one of New York’s great, classic pharmacies. It opened in 1899, when McKinley was President, and was the first licensed pharmacy in New York State, according to the New York Times. It was a store so majestic and solemn, you felt like you were entering a church when you went in. High ceilings, high shelving, a balcony, ancient Pharmacuetical relics, and silence. No music. You could find many old and classic brands there that you couldn’t locate elsewhere. And the vertical sign on the corner building was one of the grandest in the city.
The enterprise was founded by J. Leon Lascoff. He was born in Vilna, then in Russian Poland, and came to New York in 1892. His first drug store was at Lex and 83rd. He then moved across the street and then, in 1931, moved to 82nd and Lex—Lascoff’s final location. He died in 1936. His son Frederick took over the business and ran it until his death in 1970. During Fred’s time, the store had a reputation for odd cures. It sold leeches to boxers and catnip oil to lion hunters. He once sold a mixture of phenol, valerian, asafetida and iodoform to a colleague who had complained that his own pharmacy didn’t smell enough like a drug store.
After Frederick died, the business fell out of the family. It was purchased by Phil and Susan Ragusa. I assume they were still running it when it closed.

2 comments:

upstate johnny g said…

Aaarrrgggghhhhhh!!!!!!!! Another icon, another living link to the past, another glorious example of how time travel is almost possible, is closed. My girlfriend and I popped by Lascoff one morning this past summer and even though it was a weekday, they were closed. We didn’t quite get it, because we’d been there before and business seemed healthy enough. Brooks, we have you to thank for turning us on to Lascoff’s in the first place with your great posting about that neighborhood. We would go to Lascoff’s and then pop over to the Lexington Candy Shop to have a real burger and a Coke made with actual Coke syrup and carbonated water, mixed with a spoon by the fountain guy. Your Yorkville guide opened all of this up to us. Thanks.

Do you have any idea what will become of Lascoff’s?

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$69 Tix To A Great Gatsby NYE: 4 Hr Premium Open Bar & Food ($95 Value)
$69Buy Now
$95
27%
1 day
value
savings
remaining
DETAILS

Usher in 2018 with luscious libations and bygone opulence at The Daisy, a gorgeous, Art Deco-inspired haunt on the Upper East Side. Come through to The Great Gatsby New Year’s Eve starting at 9:00pm on Sunday December 31, 2017.

Grab your $69 Ticket (a $95 value) to celebrate the New Year with a fantastic 4 Hour Premium Open Bar from 9:00pm until 1:00am. You’ll get 2018 off the ground with endless rounds of farm-to-bar specialty cocktails by Beverage Director Nate Fishman.

May we suggest the Ripple My Bitcoin (Michter’s whiskey, orange liqueur, lime, cynar, ginger beer), or the American Beauty (Farmer’s organic gin, white tea-infused rosewater, lemon, prosecco) – two appealing cocktails, fit for the grandeur of the night.

Let’s definitely not forget about exquisite hors d’oeuvres courtesy of Executive Chef Juan Meza, formerly of 2 Michelin-starred Aquavit. Think: Slab Bacon Sliders, Mushroom Soup Shooters, and the Seafood Platter featuring little neck clams, octopus, prawns, and oysters graced with Champagne mignonette & tapioca pearls…

Come into this halcyon dream and soak up the vintage decadence. It will be a night that Gatsby himself would envy…

LOCATION
The Daisy
1641 2nd Avenue
(646) 964-5756
MERCHANT

Created by the team behind Agave in the West Village, The Daisy is a widely acclaimed, seasonally-driven restaurant, bar & lounge that balances effortless elegance with subtle splendor.

The gorgeously textured space with its washes of tonal grays, watercolor walls, and white marble tables with rounded corners transitions seamlessly from leisurely suppers to all-night excess.

Infuse this New Year’s Eve with chic panache at this Prohibition extravaganza. Revel in sweet sophistication as you imbibe, mingle, whisper, and laugh the night away.

When the clock strikes midnight, bottles will pop and Champagne will overflow, but rest assured your night is just getting started. Time is on your side…

Your $69 Ticket (a $95 Value) Includes:

  • Admission to A Great Gatsby NYE from 9:00pm until 4:00am on Sunday December 31, 2017.
  • 4 Hour Premium Open Bar from 9:00pm until 1:00am, including a selection of The Daisy’s Signature Cocktails, such as the Crazy in Love (vodka, grapefruit, lime, beet-elderflower) and the Hypnotize (Santera Tequila Bianco, blood orange, lejay cassis).
  • Delectable Hors D’Oeuvres such as Slab Bacon Sliders, Mushroom Soup Shooters, and the Seafood Platter.
  • Live Screening of the Ball Drop.
  • Champagne Toast at Midnight.
  • Live DJ Sets.

The Daisy’s Website | A Great Gatsby NYE

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Start Date : 12.12.2017
Historic Cooking Workshop: Sugar Plums and Wassail

December 12, 6:30 pm

Hands on candy making session with a toast to the holidays

Did you know that there are no plums in sugar plums?  This ancient sweet treat was a favorite of 19th-century New Yorkers.  Learn about their ancient and recent past in this hands-on session, package your treats up for gift giving and toast with some wassail to get the holiday spirit going!

$25 Adults:, $20 Members and Students with ID

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

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Island Historical Tour (North)

Thursday, September 7, 2017

6:00 p.m.7:30 p.m.

This event repeats on the 1st Thursday of every 2 months between 5/4/2017 and 9/7/2017.

Did you know that the Randall’s Island was once three separate land masses? The island has a rich and unique history. Come learn more about the influential people, the bridges, and the landscape changes that transformed the Randall’s Island into the beautiful park it is today!

Location

Randall’s Island Connector in Randall’s Island Park
Manhattan

Directions to this location

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Randall’s Island

Contact Number

(212) 860-1899

Contact Email

info@randallsisland.org

Categories

Education, Nature, History, Tours, Waterfront

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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In: 19th Century , Architecture , Art and Music , Civil War , Colonial Period , Native American , Transit , Visual Documentation , World War I | Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Our New Exhibit begins : July 11

Controversial  elections, voting rights, abolition and slavery!  In 1820s New York, while these issues burned in  the minds of the public—newspapers exploded  and competed  as  forums for debate!    This exhibit looks at the newly exploding  newspaper industry  of the 1820s –and the entry of  women and African Americans into the business of print.

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

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From The Museum of The City of New York: Gilded New York exhibit info

Explore the visual culture of elite New York in the late-19th and early- 20th centuries.

Inaugurating the Museum’s Tiffany & Co. Foundation Gallery, Gilded New York explores the city’s visual culture at the end of the 19th century, when its elite class flaunted their money as never before. In New York, this era was marked by the sudden rise of industrial and corporate wealth, amassed by such titans as Cornelius Vanderbilt and Jay Gould, who expressed their high status through extravagant fashions, architecture, and interior design. The exhibition presents a lavish display of some 100 works, including costumes, jewelry, portraits, and decorative objects, all created between the mid-1870s and the early 20th century. The dazzling works in the exhibition will illuminate an era when members of the new American aristocracy often displayed their wealth in storied balls in Fifth Avenue mansions and hotels. It was a time when New York became the nation’s corporate headquarters and a popular Ladies’ Mile of luxury retail establishments and cultural institutions helped launch the city to global prominence.


Continue the Gilded New York experience outside the Museum by taking a walk through Gilded-Era New York with actress Grace Gummer as your guide. Download the Gilded NY App on your iPhone or Android device today!

1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St.
Open Daily 10am–6pm

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from Eater New York:

Le Perigord Shutters After 53 Years to De-Unionize

Owner Georges Briguet plans to reopen it as a new restaurant later this year

Update: Local 100 organizer Mike Feld tells Eater that he’s been negotiating with Briguet since last year, and the owner’s been clear that he’s not happy with the increases.…

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There was a free chocolate tasting and a meet-and-greet by the current president of Louis Sherry chocolates at
Bloomingdales (E 59th St & Lexington Ave) on Saturday, December 17th, 2016, 12:00PM – 4:00PM. Pulsd also informed the public that another aspect of the celebration of the company’s anniversary was that they would be selling chocolates in the packages with the original 19th century design.

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