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Upper West Side

 

The Women Who Made New York


Julie Scelfo

Author Event
Thursday April 06, 2017 7:00 PM
(History, Cultural Studies)
Event Description
Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. But that’s not the whole story. Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made NYC the cultural epicenter of the world. Many were revolutionaries and activists; others were icons and iconoclasts. Some led quiet lives, but were influential. Scelfo reinvigorates not just New York’s history but its very identity.

Special Instructions
Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Books can be purchased after signing. If you have questions or concerns, email crm19792@bn.com or ask a bookseller for more information. facebook.com/bnupperwestside

82nd & Broadway

2289 Broadway
New York, NY 10024
212-362-8835

Store Hours:

9-10 Every Day

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Event date:
03/07/2017 – 7:00pm

Please join us on Tuesday, March 7th for the launch of How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhoodwith author Peter Moskowitz. Joining him in conversation is Ryan Sartor, host of the Difficult to Name Reading Series.

In cities all across the country, neighborhoods are changing so quickly that nearly everyone is at risk of getting priced out. The term gentrification has become a buzzword, but we’ve failed to realize that it means more than the arrival of trendy shops, much-maligned hipsters, and expensive lattes. The very future of American cities as vibrant, equitable spaces hangs in the balance.

In How to Kill a City, Peter Moskowitz takes readers from the kitchen tables of hurting families who can no longer afford their homes to the corporate boardrooms and political backrooms where destructive housing policies are devised. Along the way, Moskowitz uncovers the massive, systemic forces behind gentrification in New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, and New York.

A lively, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of City of Quartz and Once in a Great City, How to Kill a City reveals who holds power in our cities and how we can fight back.


Peter Moskowitz is a freelance journalist who has covered a wide variety of issues, from environmental disasters to the vestiges of racist urban planning. A former staff writer at Al Jazeera America, he has written for the Guardian, the New York Times, The New Republic, Wired, Slate, BuzzFeed, and many others. He is a graduate of Hampshire College and the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

Ryan Sartor is the host of the Difficult to Name Reading Series, which brings together authors, poets, journalists and others. He is a writer and is currently working on a novel.

Event address:
450 Columbus Ave
New York, NY 10024

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Though such terminology as “fair trade” and “ethical shopping” have become buzzwords in recent years, a business which has engaged in a version of this mindful commerce before it became fashionable is going out of business. By April, NYC will have seen the last of Liberty House. The story, from Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York:

Monday, February 13, 2017

Liberty House

VANISHING

Liberty House, at 112th and Broadway, is vanishing after 49 years in business. And it’s no ordinary local shop.


photo: Jed Egan, New York magazine

It is the last of its kind, a small chain of New York shops first organized in 1965 by Abbie Hoffman and other civil rights workers in Mississippi to sell goods made by poor women of color, with the profits going back to the original communities, and to support the Civil Rights Movement.

I talked to co-owner Martha who told me the shop will shutter at the end of April. They’ll be having a sale until then, from 20% to 50% off.

This time, it’s not the rent. “People aren’t shopping,” Martha said. “They’re going online. It’s convenient. They tell me, ‘I can sit at home and shop in my pajamas.’ But people have to shop local or else there won’t be any stores anymore.”


photo via Liberty House Facebook page

The second-to-last Liberty House shuttered in 2007, also on the Upper West Side. It was a victim of rising rents.

Back then, a customer told the Times, “I don’t know how you stop these people. They’re throwing everyone out right and left, and it’s going to be a neighborhood of Duane Reades and Godiva chocolates. This store should have made it.”

Said one of the shop’s partners, “The diversity of people, both incomes and interests, has lessened and we have more of what we used to call upwardly mobile people, who shop online or drive to malls, or get in cabs and go to Barneys.” …

 …

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From DNA.info.com: Keith Haring Mural May Be at Risk as Church Moves to Evict Tenants

By  James Fanelli and Ben Fractenberg | August 1, 2016 12:25pm

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from Untapped Cities:

“Researching our latest article on street photography Harvey Stein, we read New-York Historical Society’ curator Marilyn Kushner’s introduction to Stein’s new book Briefly Seen New York Street LifeKushner traces Stein’s place in the lineage of New York City street photographers, beginning with one of the earliest known photographs of New York City, a 1839-1840 daguerreotype of the Unitarian Church in downtown Manhattan shot by Samuel F.B. Morse and John Draper.

1839, we thought? This is far before the 1848 date for the Upper West Side photograph. And, it was taken by telegraph inventor Samuel Morse, then a professor of painting and sculpture at New York University and John William Draper, an inventory and chemist who founded NYU’s school of medicine. Gizmodo writes that the daguerrotype technology came over from France to New York in 1839, which makes sense given that Morse visited Louis Daguerre in Paris that same year. In fact, most of the early photographs taken by Daguerre were destroyed in a fire at his home and studio while Morse was visiting. Morse also wrote a letter to the New York Observer (his brother was the founder of the publication) describing the invention, causing quite a stir in America.

Furthermore, this Unitarian Church daguerrotype still exists – it’s in the Photographic History Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. The Smithsonian notes that the photograph was taken either in the fall of 1839 or the winter of 1840. Morse’s notebook on his experimentations with the daguerrotype is in the Library of Congress (scanned here) begins in January 1840.

Morse and Draper took many more, but Draper’s known photos from 1839 to 1840 focused on portraits and scientific matters. In 1840, he was the first person to take a photograph of an astronomical item – the moon. Were there more streetscapes? In one entry in January 1840, Morse notes that he took a view of City Hall and in February an exterior view towards Brooklyn, but his experimentations at this time were mostly for naught: “Result: Nothing!” he writes several times. After more failures, on February 12th he writes, “partially succeeded in distance, view towards Brooklyn.” Soon after that, Morse focused his energies on the telegraph.

Where might these early photographs be, if they still exist? We’re still looking but for now, it looks like Morse’s Unitarian Church image may likely beat out the Upper West side one for the title of “oldest known” photograph of New York City.

The author @untappedmich is also the author of the book Broadway, a collection of nearly 200 vintage photographs recounting the history of NYC’s famous street Broadway.“…

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from the New York Times:

An Ancient Stream Under a Manhattan Building Leads to a Dispute

By COREY KILGANNON NOV. 20, 2015

With New York City’s overheated real estate market showing no signs of cooling, disputes over developments tend to sprout like weeds. Many feel familiar: A project is too big or too unsightly and will blight a neighborhood or force out people of modest means or end the long run of a beloved mom-and-pop shop.

But a battle unfolding on the Upper West Side of Manhattan comes with a twist that if not unprecedented, is certainly unusual — a meandering subterranean river that is just one of many such streams that once coursed through the pristine and undeveloped island centuries ago.

Several of the streams flowed west out of what is now Central Park. The path of one crosses Central Park West at 74th Street and runs north to 76th Street, trickling off a faded 19th-century topographical map and into a modern-day dispute over a multimillion-dollar home renovation.

The building, an 1891 Renaissance Revival-style rowhouse at 32 West 76th Street, between Central Park West and Columbus Avenue, was bought last year for about $10 million by Dana Lowey Luttway and her husband, David Luttway.

Ms. Lowey Luttway, whose real estate investment firm, Holliswood Development, specializes in buying Manhattan townhouses, renovating them and selling them to wealthy buyers, intends to excavate an existing cellar in the property to add habitable space. She said she and Mr. Luttway, a French-born businessman, were going to move into the house with their three children.

The plan has neighbors on both sides of the building worried that excavation work there may pose structural dangers to it as well as to the adjacent homes, especially because the stream may have weakened the soil in the area.

Louise Magers, whose townhouse is next door, said she was “deeply concerned” about the safety of any excavation planned for below the building.

And Joseph Bolanos, a self-styled neighborhood watchdog who lives in an apartment on the other side of Ms. Lowey Luttway’s building, said that during a street dig in 2001, sewer workers hit running water that he believed was the stream 22 feet down. The stream, he said, had eroded the soil, causing cave-ins over the years.

Ms. Lowey Luttway said tests conducted by experts she hired did not indicate that there was a stream beneath the property. Furthermore, she said, her project would not extend that far below ground and would strengthen the stability of a structure that had been neglected for years. “This building was falling apart,” she said, adding of Mr. Bolanos, “He should be sending me roses, not opposing my restoration.”

For now, the city’s Buildings Department has prohibited excavation at the site. The agency issued a stop-work order in September, citing a lack of notification before demolition and a failure to monitor vibrations in adjacent buildings.

Mr. Bolanos said he suspected that the agency wanted to review the stream issue because the order came out after he sent officials a detailed description saying that “a significant presence of a freshwater stream in, around and under 32 West 76th Street is clearly evident.”

He said he had contacted the agency after hearing heavy work being done in the building and supported his claim that the area was unstable by providing a list of seven episodes when the ground had sunk or caved in over the years.…

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“44 Amazing NYC Places That Actually Still Exist” (Buzzfeed).

Most are bars and restaurants.

A lot of classic New York City spots might be disappearing, but you can still go to these distinctive shops, bars, and restaurants. For now, anyway.

1. Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Jeffrey Bary / Via Flickr: 70118259@N00

Russ & Daughters, a family-operated “appetizing store” focused on selling traditional Jewish fish and dairy products, has been a fixture of the Lower East Side since 1914. It’s one of the only existing stores in the entire country dedicated to appetizing.

2. Eddie’s Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Eddie's Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Joe Shlabotnik / Via Flickr: joeshlabotnik

Eddie’s Sweet Shop is an old school ice cream parlor and soda fountain that has served the neighborhood of Forest Hills, Queens, for over a century. It’s not too hard to find ice cream shops that aspire to capturing the vibe of an old-timey soda fountain, but this is the real deal.

3. Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Postdlf / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Strand may be the single most beloved and iconic used book store in the entire city, and has been a destination for bibliophiles around the world for nearly a century. The store contains a staggering amount of books and truly lives up to its hype.

4. Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

apasciuto / Via Flickr: apasciuto

Di Fara has been around since the mid-’60s but made the shift from local treasure to a destination spot for world class pizza sometime in the past decade or so. The pizza is so good that people are willing to travel from all over the city and wait for up to three hours to get a pie handcrafted by restaurant founder and pizza auteur Dom DeMarco.

5. Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Daniel Lobo / Via Flickr: daquellamanera

Greenwich Village was once a major destination for record collectors, but this large punk and metal-centric shop is one of the few stores that’s managed to stay open over the years.

6. St. Mark’s Comics, 11 St. Mark’s Place (East Village)

St. Mark's Comics, 11 St. Mark's Place (East Village)

St. Mark’s Place has been heavily gentrified over the past 20 years, but this stalwart comics shop has stuck around despite so many seedy punk and counterculture shops getting replaced with chains like Chipotle and Supercuts. (And yes, this is the comic book store from that one episode of Sex and the City.)

7. Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Scott Beale / Via Flickr: laughingsquid

Caffe Reggio has a crucial role in the development of coffee culture in the United States — it was the first establishment to sell cappuccino in America back in the 1920s. The cafe still has its original espresso machine, which dates back to 1902, and was purchased by founder Domenico Parisi when he opened the place in 1927.

8. Old Town Bar on 45 East 18th St.

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