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West Village

Come in, come in! Enter into the spectral shadows of St. John’s Sanctuary which has sat quietly for 190 years in the heart of historical Greenwich Village. But, now…lit by flickering candlelight, bathed in ghostly mist, the players at the award-winning, critically-acclaimed Radiotheatre hope to chill the marrow in your bones as they celebrate the High Holy Days of HALLOWEEN with its 9th Annual H.P. LOVECRAFT FESTIVAL…teeming with very special denizens of its own, 
so rich in bloodcurdling variety that the heart thuds loudly, sweat breaks and the cringing mind searches shudderingly 
for the next ghastly manifestation in this terrifying feast of fiendish delights! All live, onstage complete with our fabulous cast, original orchestral scores and a plethora of sound FX 
in our ongoing tribute to the Grandmaster of 20th Century American Horror himself, H.P. LOVECRAFT(1890-1937.) 
St. John’s Sanctuary    81 Christopher St.  NYC  
Off 7th Ave.  #1 train Sheridan Sq.  All W4th St Trains
THE STORIES

HERBERT WEST, REANIMATOR – A Lovecraft classic!  A mad doctor’s assistant recalls their efforts to resurrect the dead!

THE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH – A young man visits the seedy New England seaport of Innsmouth where he finds a strange breed of inhabitants. 

THE HORROR AT RED HOOK – A NYC cop uncovers a terrible cult alive in Brooklyn, but no one believes him!

THE EVIL CLERGYMAN – A man finds himself in an eerie attic with a Satanic past.

THE THING ON THE DOORSTEP – A man marries a weird woman whom he claims has possessed him body and soul!

HYPNOS – A female sculptor spends years with her mate sharing drug induced dreams where they travel to a place called Hypnos.

DAGON – A shipwrecked man discovers an island of strange beings who worship ancient gods.  After he is rescued, they pursue him. 

THE TRANSITION OF JUAN ROMERO – A gold mine explodes leaving a fathomless abyss into which a miner and his Mexican friend enter! 

THE STATEMENT OF RANDOLPH CARTER – Two scientists explore the frightening world beneath an old cemetery!


CALENDAR OF SHOWS   ALL SHOWS @  8 PM

10/19-  REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/20 – THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/21 – SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

10/25 – DAGON; STATEMENT; HYPNOS; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/28 – REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/29 – INSMOUTH; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/30 – REANIMATOR; TRANSITION

11/1 –   INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

11/3 –   THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

11/4 –   REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN 

11/5 –   DAGON; STATEMENT; EVIL CLERGYMAN; HYPNOS
SMARTTIX.COM  212 – 868-4444
WRITTEN/DIRECTED/MUSIC 
BY DAN BIANCHI
SOUND DESIGN- DAN BIANCHI/ WES SHIPPEE
CAST: FRANK ZILINYI; R.PATRICK ALBERTY; 
ALEJANDRO CARDOZO; CAITLIN BOYLE
“THE GREATEST PRACTIONER OF HORROR IN THE 20th CENTURY!”   STEPHEN KING

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A few blocks uptown, head to the Lower East Side on October 22 for a look at the Jewish gangsters who once trafficked in the area, including Arnold Rothstein, Meir Lansky and Bugsy Siegel. To the west, New Yorkers can discover the West Village on a walking tour exploring the area’s history, ecology, and architecture on October 17.…

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https://www.facebook.com/TheLostVillage2017/

I came by this information in a paper insert that was in my program for the opening reception of “Storefronts: Oral History & Photo Exhibition”:
“The Lost Village” is a stunning indictment of the corporate take-over of Greenwich Village…made possible by complicit…politicians…the bohemian, artistic world which gave the area its colorful, distinctive flavor has fled…former mom and pop shops closed. The Village is a microcosm of what is happening across the United States where the disparity of income between rich and poor is now higher than at any time in our history. This extraordinary documentary raises the alarm and…offers a way to counter such take-overs through citizen activism…A must see.” James Cass Rogers
Two upcoming Screenings-in what’s left of the Village:
SEP 7
Thu 7 PM · Jefferson Market Library · New York
SEP 10
Sun 7 PM · Judson Memorial Church – New York City · New York
Film

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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In: 19th Century , Architecture , Art and Music , Civil War , Colonial Period , Native American , Transit , Visual Documentation , World War I | Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New York City in the 1970s was perceived as a place of danger, decay, and paranoia, where people “didn’t get involved” — especially following high-profile crimes like the 1964 murder of Kitty Genovese. Read more about the legacy of the Genovese murder here.

Reviews

“Offers several dozen movies about New York that were made in the ’70s and consistently showed a city with a fading pulse. One way or another, they depict a city spinning toward a hell.”
– Clyde Haberman, The New York Times. Read the full article here.

“A MAMMOTH THROWBACK TO A GRITTIER ERA OF CITY LIFE!” 
– Ben Kenigsberg, The New York Times

“Celebrates New York at its 1970s scuzziest.” 
– J. Hoberman, The New York Review of Books

One of the most fertile periods of filmmaking in cinematic history comes back to life!”
– Robert Levin, AM New York. Read the full July 5 cover story here.

“[In the 70s,] urban blight crossed paths with Hollywood’s new interest in true grit, creating a perfect storm of films that showed the city at its worst, its people at their most desperate.”
– Matt Prigge, Metro

“FABULOUS! The films shot on location in NYC in the 1970s have become relics of a very different New York: accidental documentaries of what the city once was.”
– Jason Bailey, Flavorwire 

Trailer

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From Spoiled NYC:

MePa’s Cobblestone Streets Are Finally Getting a Facelift

Who doesn’t love a good cobblestone path to walk on?

If you’re not sporting a pair of stilettos of course…

The cobblestone streets of the Meatpacking District are a real throwback to NYC’s historic past.

But according to TimeOut NY, they’re due for getting a facelift.

It’s about time. Those cobblestones may be pretty to look at, but by now they’ve ruined enough tires and caused too many drunk girls to fall.

Funds from a $15.4 million restoration project will be going towards the work.

Most of that money will be set aside to fix the water mains and drainage issues on West 12th, 13th, and 14th streets.

While they’re there, the project will also take on the cobblestones.

They plan on using as many of the original cobblestones as possible and will be adhering to strict guidelines for the new ones so that the old look won’t change too much.

benstagett Meatpacking in the morning.📍🔹☀️#meatpackingdistrict #manhattan #nycviews #wednesdaywarmup

Here’s to making it home without bleeding kneecaps!

[Feature Image Courtesy Pinterest] [via TimeOut NY]

 

 …

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From Veranda Magazine:

Aaron Burr’s West Village Home Is for Sale

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This Sunday,  the Vintage Thrift Shop, 286 3rd
[22nd/23rd] 212.871.0777, unveils a curated assortment of vintage clothing
and accessories for women and men. At their other shop in the West
Village, it’s a collection of boho styles… David Weeks Studio is
having a spring sample sale at their store, 38 Walker [Church/Bway] next
Friday, March 31, 11-7. Lighting, custom pieces, furniture and
accessories.

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As one of the oldest buildings in the five boroughs of New York, 392 West Street has a long and storied past history. Having been among the few wood-frame buildings to have survived the increasing urbanization of Manhattan, the current owner, an individual many would consider a “wealthy eccentric” seeks to transfer the ownership/use of it to a Native American to be used as a “prayer house” under the direction of the Lenape tribe, former original inhabitants/owners of New York.

From The New York Times:
Giving Back a ‘Stolen’ Property to the Original Manhattanites
by COREY KILGANNON

Photo
Jean-Louis Goldwater Bourgeois, right, a wealthy activist, wants to turn a house in the West Village into a prayer center. His choice to run it is Anthony Jay Van Dunk, left, a former chief of the Ramapough Lenape Nation. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times

The squat clapboard house overlooking the Hudson River in the West Village might not seem like an obvious place for a Native American prayer center.

Its graffiti-strewn facade faces the busy West Side Highway, with a city bus stop out front. It once housed a series of bars, and the back of the building faces tiny Weehawken Street, which has traditionally been a popular gathering spot for gay and transgender people.

The house’s ground floor now sits directly on Manhattan soil, said Jean-Louis Goldwater Bourgeois, 76, a wealthy activist who bought the property in 2006. He says he is essentially donating it back to its original owners: the Lenape Indians.

Mr. Bourgeois wants the building to be a prayer house, to be owned and operated by the Lenape nation, which inhabited Manhattan before it was appropriated by European settlers.

Mr. Bourgeois pointed to a hole recently jackhammered through the thick concrete flooring of the house, which left black soil exposed underneath.

“You can actually touch Manhattan soil — the idea is to be in touch with Mother Earth,” he said, adding that the plan was to remove the concrete and simply have a dirt floor.

Anthony Jay Van Dunk, a former chief of the Ramapough Lenape Nation, a tribe based in Mahwah, N.J., is Mr. Bourgeois’s choice to start a prayer house, or a Pahtamawiikan, as it is known in one of the languages spoken by the Lenape.

Photo

Mr. Bourgeois said he bought the squat clapboard house, at 392 West Street, in 2006 for $2.2 million. It is covered in graffiti and overlooks the Hudson River. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times

Mr. Bourgeois said he had always been troubled by the well-known and not quite accurate legend that, four centuries ago, the Lenape sold Manhattan to Dutch settlers for the equivalent of $24 worth of goods.

“It’s quite offensive,” he said. “It’s a form of conquest.”

Mr. Van Dunk, 54, a Brooklyn woodworker who is active in Native American issues, pointed out that, if such a transaction had taken place, the Lenape might have meant it as a good-will exchange for sharing the land, and not as transferring ownership, especially because the tribe did not believe anyone could own land or water.

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