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World War I

The page, http://www.vintag.es/2015/11/rarely-seen-autochrome-photos-of-new.html , claims to display

Rarely Seen Autochrome Photos of New York in the Early 20th Century .

The images themselves span 18 years, from the earliest one dated with the year 1900, to the last, a photo of buildings with banners and signs exhorting the public to buy war bonds, with the date given as 1918. Not all of them are from New York City, several are attributed to places in Upstate New York. Though they are lovely to look at, and a few provide a glimpse of what everyday life for everyday people looked like in the thick of NYC, some people who have written into the comments section have revealed that the provenance of the images is not in all cases what the site represented them to be: some are not genuine Autochrome images at all, but colorized photos or lantern slides, and the one of two men playing chess was reportedly taken in Germany, not New York. Here are the comments, correcting some of the attributions of the images:

Some of these are not original autochromes but colorised black and white photos, e.g. the couple in Saratoga Springs, which is a detail from a colorisation by Sanna Dullaway: http://sannadullaway.com/0r…

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A number of critical errors. Image #1 (from the top down) is not an autochrome. Images #2 & 3 are autochromes by Charles Zoller (Rochester, NY). Image #4 is not an autochrome. Image #5 ( Foolish House) is an autochrome by Zoller. Images 6, 7, 8, & 9 are not autochromes. Image #10 (rooftops) is an autochrome in the collection of Wm. B. Becker and should be credited to him. Images 11, 12, 13, & 14 are by Zoller. All the Zoller autochromes are owned by the George Eastman Museum and should be credited to them. Image # 15 (chess players) is probably by Alfred Stieglitz or possibly by Edward Steichen and was taken in Germany. The last image (war bond rally) is an autochrome by J. D. Willis from the collection of Mark Jacobs.
Nearly all the non-autochrome images identified in this post are actually black & white lantern slides that have been digitally colored

 

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    Right! 6-7-8-9 are not color photographs at all, but Photochrom prints made from black and white negatives. You can see the originals online at the Library of Congress — the process is explained here: http://www.loc.gov/pictures…

    And if you’re interested in real Autochromes, including the rare New York rooftops image (#10 above), see the original postings online at the American Museum of Photography: http://photographymuseum.co…

 

 

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Public lecture by Marie Carter at QED

  • The Wartime Prohibition Act took effect June 30, 1919. In their desperation to obtain booze, locals turned to homemade forms of liquor, which to unsuspecting victims, were often poisonous, and sometimes fatal. At this lecture, we’ll examine some of these poisons and the New York City victims they harmed and killed. You can also celebrate the safety of modern day alcohol by buying booze at the QED bar!

    Marie Carter is a writer, editor, and tour guide who hails from Scotland. She is a tour guide with Boroughs of the Dead, a macabre and ghostly historical walking tour company. She designed and leads the tour “Haunting Histories and Legends of Astoria.” She is also the author of The Trapeze Diaries and the editor of Word Jig: New Fiction from Scotland. Please check out Boroughs of the Dead tours at www.boroughsofthedead.com.

  • $ 10.00

    About

    Q.E.D. is an after-school space for grown-ups. We offer affordable classes and shows that are as diverse as Queens itself. At Q.E.D. you’ll find arts and crafts, stand-up comedy, tastings, DIY projects, poetry slams, game nights, walking tours, storytelling, gardening, improv, and everything in between. Join our newsletter for awesome stuff.

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Local historians will lead a lecture–World War I Centennial commemorating World War I in America on  Saturday at 2 at the Staten Island Museum, Snug Harbor, 1000 Richmond Terr., Bldg. A. This program is supported by the Library of America. Refreshments will be served. Lecture is Free with Museum Admission. For info, visit http://www.statenislandmuseum.org/calendar-programs/world-war-i-centennial-lecture

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http://news.msn.com/us/wwi-aviation-still-alive-at-aerodrome-in-new-york

WWI aviation still alive at aerodrome in New York

David King pilots a War War I-era Fokker DR-1 reproduction tri-plane during an air show at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome on Sunday, July 6, 2014, in Rhinebeck, N.Y.

RHINEBECK, N.Y. (AP) — There’s still a place where buzzing biplanes swoop in pursuit of German triplanes, where pilots in open cockpits let their scarves flutter in the wind.

The sights and sounds of World War I flight are recreated regularly at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in New York‘s Hudson Valley, where an original American Curtiss JN-4H “Jenny” shares the sky with reproductions of a French Spad VII and German Fokkers.

WWI Aviation Still Alive at Aerodrome in NY

WWI Aviation Still Alive at Aerodrome in NY
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“I get to shoot down a Fokker triplane every Sunday afternoon,” said air show director Chris Bulko, who flew the Spad. “I call it playing with the toys here and sharing them with everybody else, and inviting them into our sandbox.”

The aerodrome 80 miles north of New York City is one of a few places scattered around the world that put on air shows based on World War I, which began July 28, 1914. The attraction also boasts a museum and hangars packed with planes from the dawn of flight up to World War II. But the weekend air shows bring the crowds. Saturday shows highlight the early history of aviation. Sundays are devoted to WWI.

Men dressed in old-time overalls start balky engines with a hard pull down on propellers. Bulko blows kisses to the crowd on takeoff and chases a doppelganger of the Fokker triplane that was piloted by Manfred von Richthofen (a.k.a. the Red Baron). No machine guns here, though pilots show off their skill by flying through falling streams of toilet paper.

Back on the ground, a cartoony melodrama plays out involving Sir Percy Goodfellow, Trudy Truelove and the scheming villains. It’s family entertainment harkening back to a perilous period.

Flying could be deadly for the young pilots, some of whom were teenagers. Planes were wood-framed, fabric-covered and flammable. Enemy pilots attacked with the sun behind them to blind their prey, sometimes amid barrages of anti-aircraft fire. Machine guns jammed. There were no parachutes.

“It’s a dangerous business simply because the planes are not reliable, in many respects. They are also sometimes difficult to fly,” said John H. Morrow Jr., an expert in WWI aviation who teaches history at the University of Georgia.

Many of the planes that made it through war were destroyed as surplus, a big reason why originals are so rare.

Aerodrome founder Cole Palen bought a few old planes in 1951 when a Long Island hangar at the site of Charles Lindbergh’s trans-Atlantic take-off made way for a shopping plaza. Palen collected pre-WWII planes for the rest of his life and reproduced hard-to-find historical planes, usually with original engines.

In 1960, he put on his first air show at an old farm he bought in the Hudson Valley.

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